Loimer 2007 Langenlois Terrassen Riesling

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

20141221_200306

This wine was a generous gift from a friend. I swapped a baby seat for this and a bottle of Adelaide Hills Pinot Noir (not yet drunk). Based on the Riesling alone I definitely got the better end of the deal.

The friend who gave this to me is not a particularly big wine drinker. However, unlike a lot of people who get slightly freaked out by my outside the norm interest in wine – and who promptly spend a fortune on giving me things like flowers, he did the sensible thing.

It might be a bit late to be handing out wine gift buying advice now but if you are buying for a wine lover (any time of year) don’t be intimidated by what you perceive to be either their knowledge or enthusiasm and buy them something other than wine. Even wine paraphernalia can miss the mark (seriously, do you know how many corkscrews we have? more than one for every room and that includes my favourite one which lives in my handbag). But a bottle of wine will ALWAYS hit the mark.

What you need to do is set yourself a budget and head to a serious (and most likely independent) bottle shop. You need to be in a wine shop where all the staff are enthusiasts and who will know their stock – so now is the not the time to head to the local.

The chances are you already know something about what the recipient likes or doesn’t like when it comes to wine (if you really have no idea then a voucher from the bottle shop might be the best idea but you can always ask the recipient for a few favourite wine suggestions) and armed with this, the bottle shop staff should be able to point you in the right direction.

And so … my good friend arrived with two classy bottles of wine. If the second is anywhere near as good as this, I am in for a treat!

While most of us have formed an association between Austria and GrĂ¼aut;ner Veltliner, it is hardly surprising that it should also produce quality Rieslings. I can’t pretend to be familiar with aged Austrian Rieslings but any lover of aged Riesling would be happy with this wine.

A striking pale gold in the glass with a pronounced nose.

The oily, rubbery, kero characters of older Riesling dominate the nose, but there are very subtle floral characteristics, including a touch of rose water.

The palate shows off more of the floral characters, along with a slight honeyed characteristic with a ton of acidity which pulls through a crisp, tart green apple, almost sherberty finish. Definite green apple skin, with plenty of texture, lovely mouthfeel and good length. A very moreish wine that delivers plenty of interest and very much a style of Riesling that I enjoy.

Most people will detect a hint of RS (I couldn’t find any tasting notes for the 07 which specified this) but this is more than balanced by the stunning acidity. In a sentence – green apple skin with a touch of honey and rosewater.

A gift – but it is available from East End Cellars where it retails around $70.
Screwcap.
I failed to note the alcohol content of the wine but the internet suggests it’s 13.5% abv which I find surprisingly high. So don’t quote me on that one.

Facebooktwittergoogle_pluspinterestmail

4 thoughts on “Loimer 2007 Langenlois Terrassen Riesling

  1. I love Austrian rieslings. I hope I get to try this one day. What I really love though is the packaging. Simple, strikingly understated.

    1. Yes, it’s beautiful modern packaging! At least this one is available in Adelaide … you just have to be prepared to part with some pennies!

  2. I’ve read much and heard recently that the kerosene character is actually a winemaking fault in Riesling. Now, that may be Australian wine making perception, but it’s interesting nonetheless. Not much hint of kerosene in Wigan or contours Riesling.

    Cheers

    Adam

    1. Oooooh, opening the ‘kero is a wine fault’ debate is rather like opening Pandora’s Box. Chapoutier went there a few years ago, and one of the comments suggests that it’s actually something which is going to occur with age, irrespective of winemaking. If any wine chemists have some insight here … please feel free to chip in!

      As I love aged Riesling it’s a characteristic I’ve grown accustomed to and enjoy and to be honest I’m actually more likely to identify it as rubber. I’d suggest that if people don’t enjoy it, then look to drink younger Rieslings because it is most prevalent in those with some age.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *